Munasterio ‘e Santa Chiara

Munasterio ‘e Santa Chiara. The song told from a Neapolitan abroad.

Munasterio ‘e Santa Chiara is a song written by Michele Galdieri in 1945 with the music by Alberto Barberis. It was written for the theatrical magazine “Imputati,alziamoci!” (Accused, let’s stand up!), by Galdieri himself, and entrusted to the voice of Giacomo Rondinella. The same year, the song arrived at Piedigrotta Festival where it was presented by Luciano Tajoli.

Among the other interpretations we remember those of Ebe De Paulis, Sergio Bruni, Roberto Murolo, Vittorio De Sica, Giuseppe Di Stefano, Claudio Villa, Mario Abbate, Peppino Di Capri, Mina, Massimo Ranieri and Lina Sastri .

Santa Chiara Church Napoli photo by A. Pagliarulo
Photoⓒ Alberto Pagliarulo

Napoli was the most bombed city during the Second World War and the author was inspired by the bombing that hit and destroyed the fourteenth-century Basilica of Santa Chiara on 4 August 1943 that was rebuilt in 1953 and finally reopened to the public.

The protagonist is an emigrant who tells of his desire and fear about returning to Napoli. He is afraid of seeing his hometown changed both for the devastation and also in the customs and traditions of the people.

But let’s take a look to the lyrics of the song.

Dimane? Ma vurría partí stasera. Luntano, no, nun ce resisto cchiù.

Dice che c’è rimasto sulo’o mare, che è ‘o stesso ‘e primma, chillu mare blu.

Munasterio ‘e Santa Chiara, tengo’o core scuro scuro.

Ma pecché, pecché ogne sera, penzo a Napule comm’era,

penzo a Napule comm’è?

Funtanella ‘e Capemonte, chistu core mme se schianta,

quanno sento ‘e dí da ‘a gente cas’è fatto malamente

‘stu paese, ma pecché?

No, nun è overo. No, nun ce créro.

E moro cu’sta smania ‘e turnà a Napule.

Mach’aggi’a fà?

Mme fa paura ‘e ce turnà.

Paura? Sí, si fosse tutto overo? Si ‘a gente avesse ditto ‘a verità?

Tutt’ ‘a ricchezza ‘e Napule era ‘o core.

Dice ch’ha perzo pure chillulla.

Translation:

Tomorrow? But I’d like to leave tonight. Far away, I can’t resist it anymore

They say that only the sea is left, the same as before, that blue sea!

Munasterio of Santa Chiara, I have a dark dark heart

But why every night do I think of Napoli as it was and I think of Napoli as it is?

Fountain of Capodimonte, this heart crashes when I hear people say that this town has become badly

‘Why?

No, that’s not true and I don’t believe it!

And I’m dying with this urge to go back to Napoli but what can I do ?

I’m afraid to go back there.

Yes, I’ m afraid.

What if it’s all true?

Are people telling the truth about it?

All the wealth of Napoli was the heart and they say that it has lost that too.

………………..

Campanile Santa Chiara
Photoⓒ Alberto Pagliarulo

In the lines above the author describes the protagonist’s desire and fear of returning immediately to his beloved Napoli, and the pain he feels in his heart hearing so many news and rumors describing a completely changed city.

………………..

Munasterio ‘e Santa Chiara, ‘nchiuse dint’a quatto mura,

quanta femmene sincere, si perdévano ll’ammore,

se spusavano a Gesù.

Funtanella ‘e Capemonte,

mo, si pèrdono ‘n’amante, giá

ne tènono ati ciento. Ca, ‘na femmena ‘nnucente,

dice ‘a ggente, nun c’è cchiù.

Translation:

Munasterio of Santa Chiara enclosed in four walls

how many sincere women who lost love, married Jesus.

Capodimonte fountain, now if they lose a lover they already have other hundred lovers.

And people say that there aren’t innocent women today.

………………..

Santa Chiara Church Napoli photo by A. Pagliarulo
Photoⓒ Alberto Pagliarulo

The consequences of the wars are poverty and devastation. So many poor people were willing to do anything to improve their situation. During those days there was a lot of hunger and prostitution so it was easy to find a woman willing to satisfy the needs of others in order to earn some money to eat.

………………..

No, nun è overo. No, nun ce créro.

E moro cu’sta smania ‘e turnà a Napule.

Mach’aggi”afà?

Mme fa paura ‘e ce turnà.

Munasterio ‘e Santa Chiara, tengo’o core scuro scuro.

Ma pecché, pecché ogne sera, penzo a Napule comm’era,

penzo a Napule comm’è?

Translation:

No, that’s not true and I don’t believe it!

And I’m dying with this urge to go back to Napoli

but what can I do ?

I’m afraid to go back there.

Munasterio of Santa Chiara, I have a dark dark heart

But why every night do I think of Napoli as it was

And I think of Napoli as it is?

………………..

The author ends the song by describing the protagonist’s will to remember his Napoli as it was before leaving. An almost systematic description of the consequences that a war brings on the affected people of this tragedy.

………………..

 

Ciro Iossa CRT-Design

 

Ciro Iossa was born in Napoli, Italy, fifty-one years ago. Raised in the historic center of Napoli he decided to move near Florence for work. While working he found time to major in computer science as a programmer. After graduation he approached the world of 3D modeling. He was so fascinated by it that he started self-taught. In a short time he assimilated the basics. Always looking for new stimuli, he also approached 3D animation by studying retopology, textures and rendering. His numerous work experiences led him to travel the world and to collaborate with high-level industries. In addition to 3D he also creates 2D images such as logos, posters, photo editing, and beyond. Beside what he made as his profession, Ciro never stopped cultivating a passion for music and for the history and traditions of his city, Napoli.

 

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